Li Ze’s Corpse Rises 李則屍變

At the beginning of the Tang Zhenyuan era (785-805 CE), Li Ze, of Shaoyin in Henan, died. Before he could be prepared for burial, a scarlet-robed person called and expressed condolences, calling himself Herbalist Su. When he entered, his grief was especially deep. Before long, the dead man rose, and began to fight with him; his family, sons and brothers fled the hall in panic. The two closed the door and beat one another, continuing equally matched until dawn. When the Li sons dared to enter, they found two corpses laid together on the bed, their height, build, appearance, hair, beard and clothing quite indistinguishable. At this, the gathered clan being quite unable to work out the matter, they buried both in the same coffin.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.14-15 (Tale 78):

李則屍變

唐貞元初,河南少尹李則卒,未斂。有一朱衣人投刺申弔,自稱蘇郎中。既入,哀慟尤甚。俄頃,亡者遂起,與之相搏,家人子弟驚走出堂。二人閉門毆擊,抵暮方息。李子乃敢入,見二屍並卧一床,長短、形狀、姿貌、鬢髯、衣服一無差異。於時聚族不能定識,遂同棺葬之。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

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Bian Hu’s Strange Corpse 卞壺屍異

Director of the Jin Department for State Affairs Bian Hu died during the Su Jun affair, and was buried in Shangyuan County.[1] Later, when thieves opened his tomb, they saw that Hu was greying at the temples, but he appeared to be alive, his two hands curled into fists, and the armour at the back of both hands pierced through. The Emperor An (r. 396-419 CE) granted ten thousand cash and ordered he be reburied.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.12 (Tale 71):

卞壺屍異

晉尚書令卞壺死蘇峻之難,葬在上元縣。後盗發其墓,見壺鬢髮蒼白,面色如生,兩手皆拳,甲穿於手背。安帝賜錢十萬,令改葬焉。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

[1] On Bian Hu 卞壺 (courtesy name Wangzhi 望之, 281-328 CE), a senior official at the Jin court who died in battle resisting the revolt led by Su Jun 蘇峻 (d. 328CE). See https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8D%9E%E5%A3%BC, and on the revolt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Su_Jun.

A Wineseller Encounters An Immortal 賣酒遇仙

In the Song Jingding era, the renxu year (1262), within the borders of Jingjiang fu one Lin Yilang opened up a wineshop, the flavour of his wine being rather good. One day, a frail and emaciated Daoist came, saying: “This poor cleric wishes to buy wine from the gentleman on credit; one thousand per day, paying back the money within a year; how about it?” Lin said: “More than a thousand would also be permissible; longer than a year would also be permissible, just as long as the Master receives a drink.” He gave the cleric several cups of wine to drink before he left. The next day he came again, and, provided with a thousand’s worth of wine, the Daoist drank it all. Lin said to his wife and son: “This Daoist is unusual; he never [139] speaks at all.” From then he came and drank, the same for six days, then took out a lump of silver from his robe and entrusted it to Lin. Lin said: “The deal is for a year, and it has not even been ten days, so why now? I certainly do not dare to accept this.” The Daoist was pleased, drinking again, and then saying: “It is said that your residence contains unburied dead; this poor cleric is skilled at geomancy, and above your residence is a certain place in Wulito where you should bury it quickly, and subsequently attain wealth and prosperity.” Lin said: “How dare one expect such things? Have some wine.” After repeated urging he finally complied. When the burial was complete, the Daoist requested wine before the tomb, and poured several horn cups over it, chanting:

Finally drunk once after fifty days,

Villagers’ homebrew outshines heavenly ambrosia.

Holding out his hand he summoned a crane, climbing aboard it and departing, not returning despite the family all beseeching him. After three years, the Lin family became greatly wealthy, and the son went straight, by means of the grain for posts exchange, into office; this is truly proof of the cleric’s skill.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後1.138-39 (Tale 244):

賣酒遇仙

宋景定壬戌,靜江府境內有林一郎者,開酒肆,味頗佳。一日,有癯瘠道人來,曰:「貧道欲與公賒酒,一日一千,限一年方還錢,可乎?」林曰:「一千以上亦可,一年以外亦可,只要先生飲得。」即與飲數杯而往。次日來,供以酒一千,道人飲盡。林與妻子曰:「此道人不凡,決不可出 [139] 言語。」自此來飲,凡六日,懷中出銀一塊權寄。林曰:「一年之約,未得十日,何故?決不敢(「敢」,明刻本、明抄本作「收」。)受。」道人喜,又飲,卻云:「聞宅上有喪未葬,貧道善風水,宅上自有地在五里頭某處,急宜葬,則立致富貴。」林曰:「安敢望此!且飲酒。」再三再四方從。葬畢,道人在墳前索酒,連沃數觥,朗吟曰:「五十日來方一醉,人間村酒勝天漿。」引手招一鶴,跨之而去,一家懇求不返。後三年,林家大發財,直(「直」,明抄本作「產」。)子納粟補官,果符其術。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Wenshan Becomes An Immortal 文山為神

Guo Yuanyi came from Luling. He once followed Wenshan Tianxiang[1] on his travels, and also performed dedicated service among the troops. In the bingshen year of the Yuanzhen era (1296), while living at home he fell ill and died, but a slight warmth was retained in his heart and chest, and, during the time he was laid out in his home before he could be buried, he revived, and said: “A person in a yellow turban escorted me to a place like a government office. There was someone dressed like a prince in gold and purple, seated raised above the hall. Your servant whispered a question to the officials on guard: ‘Who is this official presiding over the hall?’ They answered: ‘This is Prime Minister Wen.’ Your servant was secretly pleased: ‘Being long acquainted with the prime minister, he must offer the protection of a close relationship.’ I therefore mounted the dais and made a bow to one side, and Duke Wen said: ‘In our friendship how can I not provide you with protection? Nonetheless, your number is up; what can be done? You may return to wrap up your plans and domestic affairs, and then come.’” Guo, having spoken in this way, said his goodbyes to his family, settled all of his outstanding business, and then died.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.210 (Tale 374):

文山為神

郭元益,廬陵人。嘗從文山天祥遊,亦曾馳驅兵間。元貞丙申,居家抱病而死,但心胸間微暖,未殮,經宿還魂,云:「有黃巾人追至一所,若公府,見一金紫如王者狀,坐於殿上。某私問吏卒云:『殿上官何人?』答曰:『即文丞相也。』某私喜曰:『與丞相有舊,必蒙周庇。』因上殿,方一揖間,文公曰:『朋友間吾豈不能回護汝,但數至此,奈何!汝可回去區畫家事即來。』」郭如其言,與家人敍別,分付了當方死。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

[1] This is Wen Tianxiang 文天祥 (1236-83), courtesy name Songduan 宋端, also known as Wenshan 文山, who passed the civil examinations in 1256, and became famous for his resistance to Mongol rule, his eventual execution and his writing. His biography is found at Songshi 418.12533-40. See also the brief introduction here: http://www.chinaknowledge.de/History/Song/personswentianxiang.html

Secret Virtue of the Dou Lineage 竇氏陰德

[107] When Dou Yujun of Yanshan first saw his ancestor in a dream, he was told: “You lack children, and moreover will not be long-lived; why not cultivate secret virtue early, to return to good fortune.” Yujun was terrified, and from then on where among his in-laws there were dead unburied, or daughters unmarried, he helped them all in achieving these things. Even in cases where the married women had been taken and their bonds burnt, he gave gold to return these lost people; cultivating his merit willy-nilly, there was nothing he would not do. Late in life he had five sons: Yi, Yan, Kan, Cheng and Xi, and they all passed the civil service examinations in turn. People called them the ‘Five Dou Dragons’, and a poem for them read:

Yanshan Counsellor Dou

Taught his sons the virtuous way.

The trunk of the heaven tree may age,

But the Osmanthus shows five fragrant branches.

Yujun’s career extended to Imperial Censor for Admonition, and he died aged eighty, without suffering illness. Now he is a True Man in the Heavenly Caverns.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.106-7 (Tale 185):

竇氏陰德

[107] 燕山竇禹鈞,初夢其祖曰:「汝無子,又且不壽,何不早修陰德,以回造化。」禹鈞惶懼,於是內外姻婭有喪未舉、有女未嫁,皆助成之。乃至焚券嫁有夫之女,得金還去失之人,苟可修德,無不為之。晚年生子,儀、儼、侃、偁、僖五人,皆相繼登科,時人謂之「竇氏五龍」,而為詩曰:「燕山竇十郎,教子以義方。靈椿一株老,丹桂五枝芳。」禹鈞官至諫議大夫,年八十無疾而卒,今為洞天真人。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).