Dai Chengbo 戴承伯

During the Yuanhui era (473-77 CE), Dai Chengbo of the [Liu] Song bought into the Pipa Temple under the jurisdiction of Xingzhou. His inscribed tablet erroneously claimed an empty plot to the east as his residence. At nightfall he suddenly heard the sound of angry cursing and, getting up to look, saw a person of remarkably odd shape. When Chengbo questioned him, he replied: “My surname is Xi, and I’m the one who originally dwelled here. How can the gentleman wrest it away from me?” Chengbo said: “Dai Jin sold the land; I do not deserve blame.” The spirit replied: “Benefitting self, harming others; what has this to do with Jin? If you do not leave quickly, I will have to inform the Magistrates.” On finishing speaking, it vanished. Chengbo was stubborn by nature, and refused to move for it. Within ten days, he had succumbed to a sudden illness and died.

From Zhugongjiushi.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), vii, 323.2566:

戴承伯 宋戴承伯。元徽中。買荊州治下枇杷寺。其額乃悞東空地為宅。日暮。忽聞恚罵之聲。起視。有人形狀可怪。承伯問之。答曰。我姓龔。本居此宅。君為何強奪。承伯曰。戴瑾賣地。不應見咎。鬼曰。利身妨物。何預瑾乎。不速去。當令君知。言訖而沒。承伯性剛。不為之動。旬日。暴疾卒。出渚宮舊事

Tao Jizhi 陶繼之

At the end of the Yuanjia era (424-53 CE), one Tao Jizhi was serving as Magistrate of Moling, and improperly caused the execution of one Yue Ji. One night he dreamed that Ji came to him and said: “Some time ago I was killed unjustly. I appealed to heaven seeking justice, and now come to take the gentleman away.” He then leaped into Tao’s mouth, continued down until he reached the stomach, and after a short while emerged once more. He then addressed Tao again: “Now Tao of Moling will be taken directly, but as he isn’t much use, it is further decided to take Danyang.” As soon as he had finished speaking, he vanished. Tao passed away soon after, and Wang Danyang did indeed die too.

From Shuyiji.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), vii, 323.2565:

陶繼之

陶繼之。元嘉末為秣陵令。嘗枉殺樂伎。夜夢伎來云。昔枉見殺。訴天得理。今故取君。遂跳入陶口。仍落腹中。須臾復出。乃相謂曰。今直取陶秣陵。亦無所用。更議上丹陽耳。言訖並沒。陶未幾而卒。王丹陽果亡。出述異記

Yao Niu 姚牛

The villager Yao Niu, from Xu County, was a little over ten years old when his father was killed by a fellow villager. Niu sold his clothes and bought weapons, planning to take revenge. He subsequently encountered the villager before the county gate, and stabbed him amidst the crowd. When he was captured by the clerks, the chief official felt a deep sympathy for his filial piety, allowing the case to be delayed. At the next amnesty he received a pardon. The prefectural authorities had submitted requests to the emperor on his behalf, so his treatment was unique.

Some time later, the magistrate went hunting, pursuing a deer into a wild place where there were many deep and ancient wells. His horse was about to advance into one of these when he suddenly saw an old man, who raised his staff and struck the horse. The magistrate’s mount drew up, alarmed, losing the chance to reach the deer, [2539] but a servant drew a bow to shoot it. The old man told them: “There is a well here; I was afraid the gentleman would fall in.” The magistrate asked him: “Who are you?” The old man knelt straight-backed, and told him: “I am the father of Min Yao Niu. I am grateful for the gentleman saving Niu, and came to offer my thanks.” He then vanished from sight.

From Youminglu.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), vii, 320.2538-39:

姚牛

須縣民姚牛。年十餘。父為鄉人所殺。牛嘗賣〈賣原作殺。據明鈔本改。〉衣服。市刀戟。圖欲報讎。後在縣門前相遇。手刃之於衆中。吏擒得。官長深矜孝節。為推遷其事。會赦得免。又為州郡論救。遂得無他。令後出獵。逐鹿入草中。有古深井數處。馬將趣之。忽見一翁。舉杖擊馬。馬驚避。不得及鹿。 [2539] 令奴引弓將射之。翁曰。此中有井。悲君墮耳。令曰。汝為何人。翁長跽曰。民姚牛父也。感君活牛。故來謝。因滅不見。出幽明錄

Zhang Yu 張禹

[2518] During the Yongjia era (307-13 CE), the palace guard commander Zhang Yu once travelled through the Great Marsh. The sky had grown dark when he suddenly spotted a mansion with its gates open wide. Yu thus approached and when he arrived before the hall a maid emerged and greeted him. Tu said: “I was passing when the rain started, and would just like to stay over.” The maid entered to report, and soon emerged again, calling Yu forward. He saw a woman, aged around thirty years, seated under a canopy, and waited on by more than twenty maids, their clothing all luminous and beautiful. She asked Yu what he desired. Yu said: “I have my own food, and only need something to drink.” The woman ordered that a shallow pan be brought out and given to him. He therefore kindled a fire to make soup. Despite hearing the water boil, when tried it remained cold.

The woman told him: “I am a dead person, within my tomb mound. I have nobody to share with, only my sense of shame and guilt.” She then began to weep and told Yu: “I am a daughter of the Sun family from Rencheng County, and my father served as Prefectural Chief of Zhongshan. I left to marry into the Li clan of Dunqiu, and bore a son and a daughter. The boy is eleven sui and the girl seven. After my death, the Lis favoured my former maidservant Cheng Gui. Now my son is always beaten, not even sparing his head or face, and pained to the depths of the heart. I wish to kill this maid, but a dead person’s qi force is weak. I have been waiting to find someone on whom I could rely on, and I beg the gentleman to help with the matter. The rewards would be rich.”

Yu said: “Though I cherish Madame’s words, because killing people is a serious matter, I dare not take on this assignment.” The lady replied: “Why would the gentleman be ordered to take up a knife himself? It is only wished that he speak to Li and his family on my behalf, telling them what I have explained. Li will then regret Cheng Gui, and will have to offer prayers to remove this misfortune. The gentleman will then explain that he himself has power to suppress spirits. When Li hears this he will order Cheng Gui to be present for the matter, and I will have the opportunity to kill her.”

Yu made a pledge to her, and set off the next day, telling Li everything he had been told. Li was shocked and terrified, and told Cheng Gui, who was very frightened. They sought help from Yu, but just then he saw the lady Sun coming in from outside, accompanied by more than twenty female attendants. All carried knives and stabbed Cheng Gui, who immediately fell to the floor and died. Before long, Yu passed through the Great Marsh again, and the woman sent her maids out with fifty bolts of zacai coloured silks to reward him.

From Zhiguai.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), vii, 318.2517-8:

張禹

[2518] 永嘉中。黃門將張禹。曾行經大澤中。天陰晦。忽見一宅門大開。禹遂前至廳事。有一婢出問之。禹曰。行次遇雨。欲寄宿耳。婢入報之。尋出。呼禹前。見一女子。年三十許。坐帳中。有侍婢二十餘人。衣服皆燦麗。問禹所欲。禹曰。自有飯。唯須飲耳。女敕取鐺與之。因燃火作湯。雖聞沸聲。探之尚冷。女曰。我亡人也。塚墓之間。無以相共。慙愧而已。因歔欷告禹曰。我是任城縣孫家女。父為中山太守。出適頓丘李氏。有一男一女。男年十一。女年七歲。亡後。李氏幸我舊使婢承貴者。今我兒每被捶楚。不避頭面。常痛極心髓。欲殺此婢。然亡人氣弱。須有所憑。託君助濟此事。當厚報君。禹曰。雖念夫人言。緣殺人事大。不敢承命。婦人曰。何緣令君手刃。唯欲因君為我語李氏家。說我告君事狀。李氏念惜承貴。必作禳除。君當語之。自言能為厭斷之法。李氏聞此。必令承貴莅事。我因伺便殺之。禹許諾。及明而出。遂語李氏。具以其言告之。李氏驚愕。以語承貴。大懼。遂求救於禹。既而禹見孫氏自外來。侍婢二十餘人。悉持刀刺承貴。應手仆地而死。未幾。禹復經過澤中。此人遣婢送五十匹雜綵以報禹。出志怪

 

Mei Zhu 糜竺

Mei Zhu employed the arts of Tao Zhugong (i.e., the pursuit of wealth),[1] his daily profits amounting to millions upon millions, and his treasure-houses numbering in the thousands. Zhu’s character and behaviour could command even life and death. To one side of his family stables there was an ancient tomb, and a corpse lay within it. One night Zhu followed the sound of weeping, and suddenly saw a woman, backing towards him and uncovered above the waist. She said: “Long ago at the end of the Han era my tomb was opened by the Red Eyebrows,[2] who smashed my coffin and exposed my skin. Now my bare flesh lies upon the ground, and more than two hundred years have passed. I request that the general might rebury me more deeply, and beg some old cloth that I might cover myself.” Zhu thus ordered she be placed in a stone outer and baked clay inner coffin, setting out offerings when this was complete, and clothing her in black skirt and gown, placing all of this upon the tomb.

A year had passed when, passing a bend in the road, he suddenly saw that, at the woman’s burial place, a black cloud was winding about like a dragon serpent. Some people questioned Zhu: “Is this not a dragon demon?” Zhu had doubts about this strange occurrence, and so asked a household page about it. He said: “I have sometimes seen a Qing Luzhang coming and go through the gate as if it were quite natural. I wondered whether he was a deity, and didn’t dare speak up.” Zhu was by nature very suspicious, believed in avoiding those who made requests, and punishing those who spoke up with additional harshness. His page had therefore not spoken.

Zhu’s treasures were piled like hills and mountains, quite beyond reckoning, with all the utensils required to equip the land of immortals, and pearls as big as eggs scattered across the whole courtyard. It was therefore named the Treasure Court, but outsiders never got even a peep inside it. After a few days had passed, he suddenly saw a number of black-clothed youths, who came and told him: “Mei Zhu’s home will suffer a disastrous fire, and not one in ten thousand things will survive. Fortunately, because the gentleman was able to feel sympathy for an old skeleton, the Heavenly Way cannot unjustly punish the gentleman’s virtue. Therefore we will come and repulse this fire, and make sure that the gentleman’s property is not entirely destroyed. From now on, the gentleman should also take steps to defend himself.” Zhu then dug irrigation ditches to surround his inner treasure-house. Ten days later, a fire broke out within the treasure-house and burned his pearls and jades, leaving only one item in ten. It was all caused by a bronze mirror which caused dry things to ignite in the sun spontaneously.

As the fire reached its peak, [2512] he saw several dozen black-robed youths arrive and attack the flames. A dark energy arose like a cloud, then fell back upon flames to extinguish them. The youths also said: “You should gather many birds of the stork family to avert disaster. Storks are able to gather water on their nests. Your family should therefore gather a thousand jiaojing pond herons, and tend to them among the ditches. They hate fire.” Zhu sighed: “A person’s luck in gathering money has limits, and it must not brim over.” Zhu feared suffering disaster, but at that time the Three Kingdoms were waging war and expenditure increased ten-thousand-fold, so he contributed his treasures, buying chariots and robes for his former lord. Of his hundred million jin of gold, his woven silks, embroidered silks, felts and rugs, piled like hills and mountains, his thousand head of thoroughbred horses, when Shu were later defeated, not a thing remained. He died harbouring a grievance in his heart.

From Wangzinian shiyiji.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), vii, 317.2511-12:

糜竺

糜竺用陶朱公計術。日益億萬之利。貲擬王侯。有寶庫千間。竺性能振生死。家馬廄屋側。有古冢。中有伏尸。竺夜尋其泣聲。忽見一婦人。袒背而來。云。昔漢末為赤眉所發。扣棺見剝。今袒肉在地。垂二百餘年。就將軍求更深埋。並乞弊衣自掩。竺即令為石椁瓦棺。設祭既畢。以青布裙衫。置於冢上。經一年。行於路曲。忽見前婦人葬所。青氣如龍虵之形。或有人問竺曰。將非龍怪耶。竺乃疑此異。乃問其家童。云。時見青蘆杖。自然出入於門。疑其神也。不敢言。竺為性多忌。信厭求之士。有言中忤。即加刑戮。故家童不言。竺貲貸如丘山。不可算記。內以方諸為具。及大珠如卵。散滿於庭。故謂之寶庭。而外人不得窺。數日。忽見有青衣童子數人來云。糜竺家當有火厄。萬不遺一。賴君能惻愍枯骨。天道不辜君德。故來禳却此火。當使君財物不盡。自今以後。亦宜自衛。竺乃掘溝渠。周繞其庫內。旬日。火從庫內起。燒其珠玉。十分得一。皆是陽燧得旱爍。自能燒物也。火盛之 [2512] 時。見數十青衣童子來撲火。有青氣如雲。復火上即滅。童子又云。多聚鸛鳥之類以禳災。鸛能聚水巢上也。家人乃收集鵁鶄數千頭。養於池渠之中。厭火也。竺歎曰。人生財運有限。不得盈溢。竺懼為身之患。時三國交兵。軍用萬倍。乃輸其珍寶車服。以助先主。黃金一億斤。錦綺繍氈罽。積如丘山。駿馬千匹。及蜀破後。無所有。飲恨而終。出王子年拾遺記

 

[1] Tao Zhugong was a minister of Yue who abandoned imperial service to become immensely rich, and whose name came to serve as a byword for extreme personal wealth.

[2] An uprising towards the end of the Western Han era (220 BCE – 8 CE), on which see http://chinaknowledge.de/History/Terms/chimei.html.

Traitorous And Unfilial 悖逆不孝

In the village of Cunluo, in Yangzhou, within Shu, there was a man surnamed Wang who had once turned against his father and mother. People mocked him, the officials punished him, but he would not repent. One day he became seriously ill. Nearby was a temple devoted to a powerful spirit, and this addressed him in a dream: “If you approach my hall, burn incense and promise offerings, you will recover.” The betrayer dragged his exhausted body out of bed and departed. When he fell to his knees in prostration, a great snake suddenly emerged from beneath the altar. With a red crown and a black body, it was over a zhang (3.3m) in length, and wound itself around his body, keeping its head stationary before his face and licking it all the while. He cried out to the spirit for help, swearing on his life that he would never again dare to be insolent. The snake drew back, unwound itself and departed. From then on he changed resolutely into a filial son.

The unfilial are punished by the spirits, and the nether world is indeed to be feared!

Anon, Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前1.21 (Tale 36):

悖逆不孝

蜀洋州村落間有姓汪者,嘗悖逆其父母,人諷之,官罪之,皆不悛。一日病甚,近有威靈廟神,夢之云:「汝可來吾祠下,燒香許祭即愈。」悖逆之人扶憊而去。方跪拜間,神坐下忽有一大蛇出,紅冠黑質,長一丈餘,絞其身,仍以頭對其面而舐之。其人遂拜告於神,誓死不敢無狀,蛇方逡巡脫去。自後痛改為孝子。不孝為神所譴,冥冥間可畏也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.) Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986)

Hostel Pavilion Spiders 館亭蜘蛛

There was a Censor called Wei Jun who was once responsible for Jiangxia. Sent back to the capital with a message, on his return journey he stopped to transact business at a hostel pavilion. He suddenly noticed a white spider descending from one of the pavilion columns, its body extremely small. Wei Jun said: “This is a danger to people. I have heard that, though small, when it bites people even good medicine has no effect.” He therefore directed that it be killed. Presently he saw another white one descending, and had it killed like the last one. Looking up beyond it he saw that the web led to a lair, so he ordered his retinue to fetch a broom and sweep it all away, and said: “I have now eliminated the threat to life.” The following day, wishing to leave, he touched the column with his hand as he passed, and felt a sharp unbearable pain; it turned out to be the bite of a white spider on the column. Wei Jun was shocked, and immediately flicked it away. It soon swelled up, and before several days had passed this affected his entire arm. Due to this he was carried to Jiangxia in a sedan chair. Physicians and medicines had no effect, and eventually his left arm was pouring blood; when his blood was exhausted he died. Before this Wei Jun’s lady mother was in Jiangxia, and dreamed that a white-robed person addressed her: “My two brothers, younger and elder, were killed by your son. I have reported to the heavenly emperor, and the emperor has avenged this injustice according to my request.” When they finished speaking, the lady awoke in shock. Marvelling greatly at it, she was too disturbed to speak. A little more than ten days later, when Wei Jun arrived and she heard the full story, she came to understand the dream, realising that the day of her vision was indeed that on which he had killed the spider in the hostel pavilion. The lady wept and said: “How can you live for long now?” Several days later Wei Jun died.

Zhang Du 張讀, Xuanshi Zhi 宣室志 (Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination),1.3 (Tale 4):

館亭蜘蛛

有御史韋君,嘗從事江夏,復以奉使至京,既還,道次商於館亭中。忽見亭柱有白蜘蛛曳而下,狀甚微。韋君曰:「是為人之患也。吾聞汝雖小,螫人,良藥無及。」因以指殺焉。俄又見一白者下,如前所殺之。且視其上,有綱為窟,韋乃命左右挈箒盡為盡掃去,且曰:「為人患者,吾已除矣。」明日欲去,因以手撫去柱,忽覺指痛不可忍,乃是有一白蜘蛛螫其上。韋君驚,即拂去。俄遂腫焉,不數日而盡一臂。由是肩輿舁至江夏。醫藥無及,竟以左臂潰為血,血盡而終。先是韋君先夫人在江夏,夢一白衣人謂曰:「我弟兄二人為汝子所殺。吾告上帝,帝用雪其寃,且遂吾請。」言畢,夫人驚寤。甚異之,惡不能言。後旬餘而韋君至,具得其狀,方悟所夢,覺為夢日,果其殺蜘蛛於館亭時也。夫人泣曰:「其能久乎!」數日而韋君終矣。

Zhang Du 張讀, Xuanshi Zhi 宣室志 (Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination)in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

The version transmitted in the Taiping Guangji varies slightly from this:

Wei Jun 韋君

There was a Censor called Wei Jun who was once responsible for Jiangxia. Sent back to the capital with a message, on his return journey he stopped to transact business at a hostel pavilion. He suddenly noticed a white spider descending from one of the pavilion columns, its body extremely small. Wei Jun said: “This is a danger to people. I have heard that, though small, when it bites people even good medicine has no effect.” He therefore directed that it be killed. Presently he saw another white one descending, and had it killed like the last one. Looking up beyond it he saw that the web led to a lair, so he ordered his retinue to fetch a broom to remove it all, and said: “I have now eliminated the threat to life.” The following day, about to leave, he touched the column with his hand as he passed, and felt a sharp pain that he could not bear; it turned out to be the bite of a white spider on the column. Wei Jun was shocked, and immediately flicked it away. Soon the swelling grew, and before several days had passed this affected his entire arm. Due to this he was carried to Jiangxia in a sedan chair. Physicians and medicines had no effect, and eventually his left arm was pouring blood; when his blood was exhausted he died. Before this Wei Jun’s lady mother was in Jiangxia, and dreamed that a white-robed person addressed her: “I had three brothers, younger and elder, and two were killed by your son. I have reported to the heavenly emperor, and the emperor felt sympathy and agreed to my request.” When they finished speaking, the lady awoke in shock. Marvelling greatly at it, she was too disturbed to speak. A little more than ten days later, when Wei Jun arrived and she heard the full story, she came to understand the dream, realising that the day of her vision was indeed that on which he had been in the hostel pavilion. The lady wept and said: “How can you live for long now?” Several days later Wei Jun died.

From Xuanshizhi

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Period of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), x, 476.3920:

韋君

有御史韋君嘗從事江夏。後以奉使至京。既還。道次商於。館亭中。忽見亭柱有白蜘蛛曳而下。狀甚微。韋君曰。是人之患也。吾聞雖小。螫人。良藥無及。因以指殺焉。俄又見一白者下。如前所殺之。且觀其上。有綱為窟。韋乃命左右挈帚。盡為去。且曰。為人患者。吾已除矣。明日將去。因以手撫去柱。忽覺指痛。不可忍之。乃是有一白蜘蛛螫其上。韋君驚。即拂去。俄遂腫延。不數日而盡一臂。由是肩舁至江夏。醫藥無及。竟以左臂潰為血。血盡而終。先是韋君先夫人在江夏。夢一白衣人謂曰。我弟兄三人。其二人為汝子所殺。吾告上帝。帝用憫其寃。且遂吾請。言畢。夫人驚寤。甚異之。惡不能言。後旬餘而韋君至。具得其狀。方悟所夢。覺為夢日。果其館亭時也。夫人泣曰。其能久乎。數日而韋君終矣。出宣室志

Heavenly Wrath On Corrupt Officials 天譴墨吏

At the beginning of the Tang Zhenguan era (627-49 CE), the Director of Danyang, Wang Qiong, was summoned and dismissed in his third year. Qiong was extremely resentful, and took a great deal of money, visiting the Maoshan Daoist Ye Lingzhong, and seeking a memorial to the throne that would predict the future. Lingzhong was ninety years old, and, when forced to produce the petition, the paper floated up on incense smoke and disappeared into the mists. Soon after it fell back to the ground, with a note in red ink added to the end: “Accepting a hundred liang of gold, taking three years’ salary, murdering two people; these will be resolved after death.” One year later, Qiong died suddenly without illness.

上1.16 (Tale 85):

天譴墨吏

唐貞觀初,丹陽令王瓊,三年調集,遭黜。瓊甚憤惋,乃齎百千,詣茅山道士葉靈中,求章奏以問吉凶。靈中年九十,強為奏之,其章隨香烟飛上,縹渺不見。食頃復墮地,有朱書批其末,云:「受金百兩,折祿三年;枉殺二人,死後處斷。」一歲,瓊無疾暴卒。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

A version of the same tale, showing several variations, is found in the Taiping Guangji:

Ye Xuzhong 葉虛中

At the beginning of the Tang Zhenguan era (627-49 CE), the Director of Danyang, Wang Qiong, was summoned and dismissed in his third year. He was extremely resentful, and visited the Maoshan Daoist Ye Xuzhong, seeking a memorial to the throne that would predict the future. Xuzhong was over ninety years old, and, when forced to produce the petition, the paper floated up on incense smoke and disappeared into the mists. Soon after it fell back to the ground, with a note in red ink added to the end: “Accepting a hundred liang of gold, taking three years’ salary, murdering two people; these will be resolved after death.” One year later, Qiong did indeed meet a sudden end. From Duyizhi.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), ii, 73.456-57:

葉虛中

唐貞觀初。丹陽令王瓊。三年調集。皆黜落。甚憤惋。乃齋宿于茅山道士葉虛中。求奏章以問吉凶。虛中年九十餘。彊為奏之。其章隨香煙飛上。縹渺不見。食頃復墮地。有朱書批其末云。受金百兩。折 [457] 祿三年。枉殺二人。死後處分。後一歲。瓊果得暴疾終。出獨異志

Pei Zhang’s Unhappy Wife 裴章薄妻

Pei Zhang was from Hedong; his father Zhou had once garrisoned Jingzhou. Their private monk, Tan Zhao, had made great achievements in the Way, and able to comprehend good and bad fortune. As a youth Zhang had profound respect for Tan Zhao, who said that his career and prestige would surpass that of his father. When Zhang reached the ‘capping age’ (i.e., adulthood, at around 20), his father married him to a daughter of the Li family. On passing the age of thirty, Zhang followed a posting to Taiyuan, leaving his wife in Luozhong, ‘passing the door but never entering’ (i.e., being too busy to visit), never taking her along with him. Lady Li felt herself to have been born under an unlucky star, often wearing coarse clothes and a mourning hairstyle, reading Buddhist texts and eating simple food. After a further decade, when his father transferred from Jingzhou to garrison Taiyuan, Tan Zhao followed him. Zhang therefore saw Zhao to renew their acquaintance, but Zhao was shocked and sighed for a long time, addressing him: “Fifty years ago this poor cleric often said Your Excellency would scale the heights; now you are quite weakened and exhausted. How has this happened?” Zhang told him of his unhappy wife. Zhao said: “The lady has complained to the Lord on High, and he punishes Your Excellency.” Ten days later, he cut his stomach open with a knife in the bathtub; his five organs fell to the ground, and he subsequently died.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.13 (Tale 73):

裴章薄妻

河東裴章者,其父胄,曾鎮荊州。門僧曇照,道行甚高,能知休咎。章幼時為曇照所重,言其官班位望過於其父。章弱冠,父為娶李氏女。乃三十年餘,章從職太原,棄其妻於洛中,過門不入,別有所挈。李氏自感其薄命,常褐衣髽髺,讀佛書,蔬食。又十年,嚴經自荊州移鎮太原,曇照隨之。章因見照敍舊,照驚噫久之,謂之曰:「貧道五十年前常謂郎君必貴,今削盡,何也?」章自以薄妻之事啟之。照曰:「夫人生魂訴上帝,以罪處君。」後旬日,為其下以刀劃腹於浴斛,五臟墮地,遂死。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

Wang Fan’s Tomb 王樊冢

The Dunhuang shilu reports: When Wang Fan died, a thief opened his tomb and saw Wang Fan playing chupu (a form of boardgame) with someone; he rewarded the robber with wine, and the thief drank it in terror, watching someone lead a bronze horse out of the tomb. That night a divinity arrived at the city gate, announcing that it was the envoy of Wang Fan, that someone had opened his tomb, marking his lips by swallowing dark wine, and that when that person returned at dawn they could verify this and capture him. When the thief entered the city, those on the gate therefore bound and questioned him, and it was just as the divinity had said.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.8 (Tale 61):

王樊冢

《燉煌實錄》云:王樊卒,有盗開其冢,見王樊與人樗蒲,以酒賜盗者,盗者惶怖飲之,見有人牽銅馬出冢者。夜有神至城門,自言是王樊使,今有人發冢,以酒墨其唇,但至,可以驗而擒之。盗既入城,城門者乃縛詰之,如神言。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)