Shooting Spirit-Crows With Pellets 彈打神烏

Sister Qingxi was the third younger sister of Marquis Jiang, and in her temple were six paper-mulberry trees, luxuriant and widely spaced, offering cover and shade. There were crows that frequently raised their young in the trees, and one Xie Qing hurled pellets and killed several dozen of them, but then had the feeling that the spirit felt their loss. When night came, he dreamed that an exquisitely dressed woman, wearing an angry expression, approached and rebuked him: “Those crows are raised by me; why attack them? You have ten days to provide them with compensation.” The next day he went to the shrine at dawn to offer his thanks, but these were rejected, and after ten days he was dead.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.224 (Tale 399):

彈打神烏

清溪小姑乃蔣侯第三妹,廟中有六穀樹,扶疏蔭映。有烏常產育於樹。有謝慶者,挾彈彈殺數十枚,即覺精神若有所喪。至夜,夢一女衣裳楚楚,怒色而至,責曰:「烏我所養,何以見侵?限十日以汝償之。」次早往廟告謝,不許,旬日而卒。

 

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Advertisements

A Spirit Uses Human Speech 神作人言

In the Song era, in a county belonging to Tanzhou there was a pawnbroker called Zhang Yong, who cut down a vertical post from the shrine to a spirit to reinforce the framework of a residence. The beam was finished but not yet painted. When Zhang and his dependents entered the house to look, they would often hear somebody answering them; if they asked for tea, it would say “Tea is coming.” If they asked for wine, it would say “Wine is coming.” There was nobody to be seen, but a voice could be heard. The population said this must be the spirit of the temple who had come to take the wood and secretly occupied the house, and if they could have an official of good fortune to calm and control it, they could later gradually move in successfully.

At that time a registrar called Zhao was travelling to his post, and, before entering the government hostel, stayed there for several days, and the voice temporarily stopped. Zhang then moved into the residence, but suddenly heard someone speaking again: “You had an official intimidate me, and will undergo imprisonment and come to meet me.” After that it fell silent. More than a year had passed when Zhang was summoned by a messenger from his superior and placed in charge of a prison, where he died one day, his body turning blue-black all over. When an official was appointed to investigate this, Zhang’s servant reported: “In the early morning I brought his meal, so I cooked an eel carp and sent it to him. He had only just finished eating when he tried to lie down and he died. [221] My sister-in-law once said that eel carp heads could treat illness, so the head has been preserved.” It was demanded that the head be examined, and the fish turned out to have four eyes. From this Zhang’s family understood that this must be a haunting by the spirit of the temple, and that this had cost him his life, so they decided to drop further legal proceedings.

It is well-known that four-eyed fish can kill people.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.220-21 (Tale 391):

神作人言

宋朝潭之屬縣有典押張永者,伐神廟木豎一居稍壯,構架已畢,但未粉飾。張與其眷屬入內觀看,常有人應答,如喚茶,則曰「茶來」,如索酒,則曰「酒來」,不見有人,但聞有聲。衆謂此必廟神來取木而陰據此屋,若先得官員福氣鎮壓,然後徐徐遷入為好。適有趙主簿赴任,未入官舍,先寓數日,則其聲頓失。張遂遷入屋,忽又聞有云:「你令官員嚇我,候過獄中來與你相會。」自爾寂然。越一年餘,張為上司專人追呼,置司存(上三字原作「存置司」,據明刻本改。)於獄,一日死,而遍身青黑,委官究問,則其僕供云:「早晨送飯,乃煮一鰻鯉來與押,才喫未久,求卧而死。 [221] 其嫂曾云,鰻鯉魚頭可以醫瘵,今此頭尚存。」索至看驗,魚乃四目。其眷屬自知此必廟神為祟,以戕其性命,甘願息訟。信知四目魚能殺人者也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Shigong Assists A Scholar 石公待士

The Xindu Shigong Temple of Anren County, in Hengzhou, was devoted to the White Serpent. In autumn, the gengyin year of the Zhiyuan era (1340?), a scholar going to a hostel was delayed, and lodged below the Shigong hall, and therefore prayed to the spirit: “Being in difficulties on the road, I hope the deity will show the way.” The spirit granted him a dream, and said: “In Hubei there is a great merchant, presently seen within this county town. His feet are terribly afflicted by sores, and he has expended five hundred thousand on seeking physicians. The physicians, however, have exhausted their skills to no effect; you will go and give him treatment.” The scholar said: “Your servant has never had skill in medicine; how can this be done?” The deity replied: “This merchant once boarded a boat before my temple and peed towards my shrine. I became angry at him and sent a small demon to prick his shins with a nail, leading to this. You should take ash from my incense burner and rub his sores. They will then be healed. If a reward is given, you may take it all as travel expenses, looking to the future and keeping my words secret. If not, what you gain will all be lost, and my offerings will lose their magnificence.” The scholar waited for the dawn and then went to the place directed, using things as directed. The great merchant’s sores then healed, and the scholar was rewarded as predicted. Due to all this the merchant declared him a lifelong friend. One day he asked about how the medicine had been obtained, and the scholar candidly explained the cause. The merchant was resentful, so made obeisances at the town god temple and paid for ten feasts at the Water and Land Festival, in order to bring a case against Shigong. At the fourth feast, Shigong appeared again to the scholar in a dream, saying: “At first, sympathizing with your hardship, means were provided for your salvation. Having been warned not to share secrets, you have now spoken of them. I am facing disaster, and everything you have gained will also be lost.” When the fifth feast was being prepared, lightning burst over the temple and burned it, and the scholar too fell ill and died.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.217 (Tale 385):

石公待士

衡州安仁縣新渡石公廟素靈。至元庚寅秋,有士人趁旅邸不及,寓宿於石公祠下,遂禱於神云:「旅中困乏,冀神指迷。」神予之夢曰:「湖北有巨商,見在本縣城中,足瘡苦甚,已出五百千求醫。而醫者盡其伎不能效,汝往與醫。」士人云:「某素不善醫,奈何?」神曰:「此商嘗乘船在吾廟前對吾廟尿,吾怒之,令小鬼以釘刺其脛,故爾。汝以我殿上香鑪灰與擦其瘡,即愈。若如所酬,儘可為旅費,卻望隱吾言,不然汝所得隨喪,而吾之香火亦不隆矣。」士人俟天明前往彼處,如其言用之,巨商之瘡隨愈,而士人所得如數。巨商因此與士人為刎頸交。一日叩其得醫藥之因,士人遂直言其所以。巨商不平,遂於城隍廟拜設水陸齋十筵,以訟石公。至四筵,石公又託夢與士人言:「當初憫汝之貧,故以見告而周急。已嘗戒祝毋泄,今又言之,我亦遭禍,而汝所得亦喪。」設齋至第五筵,雷轟其廟而焚之,士人亦病喪焉。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Ghost Avenges Injustice to A Son 鬼雪子冤

In the Song Xianchun era, the jiaxu year (1274), Zhao Shichun of Jizhou was appointed to the Jinghu Regional Investigation Office as an investigating officer. One evening, sitting alone in his rooms, writing out in vain a draft of the affairs of his relatives’ lives and deaths, when he began to have a suspicious feeling, and suddenly heard a voice like that of an elderly woman coming from outside the window; he picked up a sheet of paper lying near a tear in the partition, and stepped forward to read it. It read: “My son Wei was murdered by Lan so-and-so, his body cut into two pieces, one in the grassy pool and one on the bank, then buried by Peng so-and-so, where they still remain. Now the corpse gathered sprouts moustaches, and must be the body of Zhao Baiqi. My son had no moustache, and also wore no black coat.” When had finished reading, the handwriting disappeared. Zhao, greatly alarmed, petitioned the chief clerks the next day, using all his might to redress this business, pursuing the murderer, [240] named Lan, from office; each admitted their guilt and was sentenced.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.239-40 (Tale 433):

鬼雪子冤

宋咸淳甲戌,吉州趙師櫄任京湖憲司檢法官。一夕,獨然燈在閒室中,書擬黄其姓者身死事,方疑貳間,忽聞窗外有似老嫗聲,持一紙在隙間而進,視之,寫云:「我兒委被藍某殺死,分屍作兩段,一在草潭內,一在岸上,得彭某用土掩埋,至今尚在。今所檢之屍生鬚者,乃是趙百七屍身。我兒無鬚,更無皁衫也。」看畢,字跡即滅。趙大驚,次日稟使長,力平反此事,追行兇人 [240] 藍其姓者出官,一一伏罪就刑。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Warning Against Selling Ancestral Graves 戒賣祖墳

From the dingchou year of the Zhiyuan era (1278), for more than ten years, rich families found themselves impoverished, with almost nothing left, their ancestral tombs overgrown and dirty, unreachable for ancestral offerings; they could not bear to admit this even to themselves. Who would have thought that such a disaster could have been seen [105] outside the Sitingji? In the vicinity there was a scholar who, seeing a prominent family sell their ancestral graveyard, could not bear his indignation, and at night inscribed a poem on their wall. The next day, when the wall was seen, both buyer and seller were full of shame, and retreated to the central chamber to discuss the matter. I read the poem. Its language was direct and ardent, with benefit to customs and morality, so I set it down here, to serve as a warning to public ways. The poem reads:

A family selects by wind and water

For descendants in countless generations

Who could know that latecomers

Would sell off their ancestors’ land?

Bargaining over digging in the dead of night

Celebrating the drunken signing of contracts

The seller is certainly inhuman

The buyer is also an evil type

If the land is well-chosen

The house will stand in wealth and honour

Those who come to sell

Their land will bring no good

Those future descendants emerging

They break from the pattern of precedent

Pretending that new families have strength

How can the creator have such selfish intent?

Those with coffins are laid bare

Those without abandoned bones

When new generations slide to poverty

When may they ever find burial?

Can you know those ‘below the springs’ (i.e., in the nether world)

Make no plaint for justice to the throne?

Say not that heaven is vast and obscure,

But stand before it in fear of calamity.

Ah! Those with human hearts, they should look at this and change their plans.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.104-5 (Tale 181):

戒賣祖墳

至元丁丑以來,十數年間,富家零落殆盡,祖墳蕪穢,弔祭不至,自不忍言。誰謂其禍又有 [105] 出於《思亭記》之外者!近有一士人,見一名家出賣祖墳,不勝其憤,夜題詩於牆壁。次日,觀望如堵,買者、賣者皆有愧色,議中寢。吾讀其詩,語直而切,以其有益於風教,故錄於此,庶可為世俗之戒也。詩曰:「人家擇風水,子孫百世計。誰知後來者,反賣祖宗地。商量寅夜掘,醉後樂書契。賣者固非人,買者亦惡類。其地若果佳,其家長富貴。其人賣至此,其地必不利。他時出子孫,斷是傚此例。借曰異姓強,造物豈私意?棺存且暴露,無者骸骨棄。後代轉日貧,何時可薶瘞。安知泉下人,含冤不訴帝?勿謂天茫茫,禍患恐立至。」吁!有人心者,宜於此焉變計矣。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Repay Injustice, Settle A Dispute 冤報解和

[127] There was once a merchant who went to Shu (Sichuan), sharing a boat with a rich trader. One day, the boat was moored on the riverbank and all the servants went ashore, leaving the merchant alone. He wanted to steal the other’s property and seeing that the rich trader was washing his hands to one side of the deck, he went and shoved him into the river. The wealthy trader leaped back up out of the water, grasping the rail in his hands, so the other took up a knife and chopped away all five fingers; the trader sank into the river and drowned. Snatching up all of his goods, the merchant returned with great wealth.

One day, he dreamed that the wealthy trader came to his neighbour’s house, and he awoke with a start. When he sent people to check this, a baby boy had indeed been born, and he ordered that it be nurtured and raised, providing money for the child’s support. When the child was five or six, he adopted it into his own family, nurturing it personally; every day he indulged all the boy’s wishes. On reaching the age of capping (20 sui), the boy suddenly became addicted to drink and gambling, stopping at nothing in pursuit of pleasure and desire, losing uncountable piles of tens of thousands every day, and continuing like this for several years.

One day he had lost a great deal, but in the evening wanted still more money. The head of the household told him: “You have already lost a lot; keep some for the future.” His son became very angry, taking a knife and hacking at him. The older man raised his hand to ward off the blade, and his five fingers fell to the ground. His retinue managed to seize the young man, and he pleaded for his life to be spared. The older man addressed him: “In a former life you were a wealthy trader. I travelled with you on the same boat but plotted to steal your property and killed you. Having discovered in a dream that you had been reincarnated, I nurtured and raised you from childhood until you became fully grown, paying for whatever you wanted; calculated altogether, this has now returned your property to you. Now that my five fingers have also been taken, this is enough to repay the debt, minus the one human life. If I used my wealth and handed you over to the authorities, having you executed would be easy. I fear that this process of retribution for unpunished wrongs might then go on endlessly, so I now release you, sending you off with whatever property you need to establish fields and household in some other faraway prefecture, resolving once and for all this need for revenge.” The young man thanked him and departed.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前1.126-27 (Tale 221):

冤報解和

[127] 有一商人入蜀,與富商同舟。一日,艤舟江滸,從僕皆上岸,惟此商,欲圖其財,見富商在船旁盥手,遂推之於江,富商又躍起,手拏船舷,又為持刀斷其五指,遂墜江而死。席卷財物,歸成大富。一日,夢富商來其鄰家,驚覺。遣人視之,果生一男子,遂命育之,給以乳哺之資。年五六歲,收歸其家,撫之猶手,每日恣其所欲。及年冠,忽嗜飲賭博,無所不至,一從其意,日輸累萬亦不較,如是者數年。一日多敗,及晚猶欲索錢。主家語之曰:「今日已輸多了,尚有來日。」 其子忿怒,拔刃斫之,主家舉手捍禦,五指俱落,得左右人擒住,倖免不死。主語之曰:「汝前生為富商,我與同舟,圖汝財,害汝命,續夢汝託生,我撫育自少至長,恣汝所欲,總而計之,亦可以還汝財物矣。今又傷我五指,亦足以還,但所欠一命耳。以我財力置汝於官,殺之不難。又恐冤冤相報無已,今放汝去,更隨汝意財物,可遠去他郡,別置田宅,解釋冤讐。」其人感謝而去。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Aggrieved Spirits Become Visible 冤鬼現形

In the guiyou year of the Song Chunyou era (1253), in Duanyang there was a person surnamed Chen, who plotted to kill a seller of medicinal herbs, and to carry away a boatload of medicine. He plotted this together with the merchant’s servant. On returning he went himself to open up a druggist’s shop, and when the time came to make sales, he unwrapped the bundled medicines, but inside he saw the head of the murdered tradesman. Unwrapping every bundle they were all the same. He became completely terrified, leaped up once, and died.

Moreover, in a bingyin year, in Yuanzhou there was a monk whose surname had formerly been Wang, who followed the official Liu Cui in Changwu, seizing the abbot of a Chan monastery. Before this, the monks of that monastery had all exhausted their funds and borrowed money so they claimed it; the abbot had not been there long, and was frightened that he might seize the monastery. The monk thought that the repayments already made had been heavy enough, and refused to pay more, offering only 300,000 as payment. Monk Wang wished to seize it all with main strength, and although it was strongly fortified and resisted, the abbot cut his own throat in angry despair. Monk Wang took all the monastery’s treasure and returned, but whenever crossing a watery place, he always saw the dead abbot following behind him. On reaching his home compound, whenever he glanced in a mirror, he would always see the dead monk behind his left or right shoulder, and due to this never dared to use a mirror. After the extensive burning of incense and spirit money, he found peace for a time. After [122] several years had passed, the monk Wang suddenly developed a sore on his left cheek, its pus and blood never drying, and eventually he died.

It is thus clear that the burden of taking human life cannot be borne, and that rancour endures in the darkest places.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.121-22 (Tale 211):

冤鬼現形

宋淳祐癸丑年間,端陽有陳其姓者,謀殺一販生藥商人,席卷一船生藥。蓋與商僕共圖之。歸則自以開張藥局,遇發賣之時,解開藥裹,則見被殺商人之頭在內,裹裹皆有。其人驚駭,一躍而亡。

又丙寅年間,袁州有僧俗姓王者,隨劉倅官於常武,於倅奪一禪寺住持。先是,此寺之僧皆竭資舉債而圖之,住持未久,而遽遭其奪寺。僧思前費已重,後顧無償,只得又經營三百千貼之。王僧志在強奪,堅然不允,而寺僧憤鬱自刎。王僧席卷寺財而歸,沿途凡渡水處,即見死僧隨後。到鄉所歸院,每覽鏡,又嘗見死僧在肩之左右,於是不敢用鏡,廣燒香紙,以期平善。越 [122] 數年,王僧忽左腮患瘡如碗,膿血不幹,竟斃。信知人命不可負,其冤對在冥冥間也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).