Hu Daoqia 胡道洽

Hu Daoqia described himself as a man of Guangling. He enjoyed matters of music and the medical arts. His body had a foul smell, and he always used a famous fragrance to guard against it. His only fear was of vicious dogs, and he knew the date of his own death, warning his younger brother and his son: “When my breath stops bury me quickly. Do not allow dogs to see my corpse.” He died in Shanyang, but when burial preparations were complete, the coffin felt empty, and when it was opened to check, there was no sign of a body. People at the time all said he was a fox. From Yiyuan.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), ix, 447.3656:

胡道洽

胡道洽。自云廣陵人。好音樂醫術之事。題有臊氣。恒以名香自防。唯忌猛犬。自審死日。戒弟子曰。氣絕便殯。勿令狗見我尸也。死于山陽。斂畢。覺棺空。即開看。不見尸體。時人咸謂狐也。出異苑

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Crocodiles 骨雷

Crocodiles come from the realm of Funan, being two or three zhang in length (i.e. 10 to 13 metres), with four feet, like a gecko in shape. They frequently swallow people whole, and the princes of Funan order people to catch these fish and place them in their moats, so that criminals can be thrown to them. If they are worthy of death, the crocodiles will eat them; if they are without guilt, this will be scented and they will not be eaten. Crocodiles are also called hulei; bears are able to control them, grasping their snouts and dragging them to the bank, then pulling them apart and eating them. Also known as gulei, they transform into tigers in autumn, having three talons, and issue forth from the two prefectures Si and Lei in Nanhai; Yingpan Village in Linhai has many of them.

From Zhiwenji.

Li Fang 李昉, et al., Taiping guangji 太平廣記 (Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Harmony), 10 vols (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1961), x, 464.3822:

骨雷

扶南國出鱷魚。大者二三丈。四足。似守宮狀。常生吞人。扶南王令人捕此魚。置於塹中。以罪人投之。若合死。鱷魚乃食之。無罪者。嗅而不食。鱷魚別號忽雷。熊能制之。握其觜至岸。裂擘食之。一名骨雷。秋化為虎。三爪。出南海思雷二州。臨海英潘村多有之。

出洽聞記

Dragon Sighting at Sangumiao 三姑廟龍見

Close by the Sangu Temple dedicated to the silkworm deity in Daming a dragon was sighted, reclining on three cottages; the witnesses numbered several hundred. From the dragon’s scale and shell could be seen growing golden hair; in shape it was like a camel’s hump, its head rising like to equal great trees, and with its rotting fish smell none could approach. Having descended, it was tangled and could not rise, but after a long time cloud and mist gathered once more, and it then departed. This took place in the seventh or eighth month of the jiyou year.[1]

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), 3.53:

三姑廟龍見

大明蠶神三姑廟旁近龍見,橫卧三草舍上,觀者數百人。見龍鱗甲中出黃毛,其形如駝峯,頭與一大樹齊,腥臭不可近。既墮,夭矯不得上,良久雲霧復合,乃去。時己酉歲七八月間也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.) Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986)

[1] The jiyou year would be the forty-sixth year of the sixty-year cycle; in this case it could have been 1189 or 1249 CE; our compiler Yuan Haowen (1190-1257) would have been alive during the latter year.

 

Punishing A Python Through The Law 法誅蟒精

The Qiongzhou Daoist Zhang Biyun (lit. ‘Jade Cloud Zhang’) performed the Thunder Rites. He was famous across Sichuan, supernatural beings resenting and fearing him. At that time the ‘Disciple of Heshan’ Wei Wenweng (Wei Liaoweng 魏了翁?[1]) was governing Xuzhou, and his wife fell ill, the sickness persisting for a long time without recovery, so he dispatched a runner with a letter describing it, sending it to Biyun. Biyun thus wrote out two talismans and gave them to the runner, praying and saying: “Burn these within the hall, and through this a thing within your kitchen will be cremated.” The runner returned and reported to Wenweng, burning it as instructed. Several days later, they found the chambers filled with a foul smell, and suddenly noticed beneath a shelf [164] a giant python, five or six zhang in length (c.17-20m), and already quite dead. His household then understood that this was a python demon, and his wife’s illness was then cured.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後1.163-64 (Tale 284):

法誅蟒精

邛州道士張碧雲,行雷法,四川有名,鬼神望而畏之。時魏鶴山弟文翁知敘州,內人得病,纏緜不愈,差二承局持書與狀,去投碧雲。碧雲即書二符與承局,祝云:「堂內焚化,以一就竈中焚化。」承局歸告文翁,如其言焚之。數日後,但聞滿屋臭穢,忽於閣(「閣」原作「闔」,據明刻本改。)板 [164] 下見一巨蟒,長五六丈,已死。其家方知為祟者蟒也,夫人之病遂安。

[1] On Wei Liaoweng 魏了翁, see http://www.chinaknowledge.de/History/Song/personsweiliaoweng.html

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Spirit Treats Footrot 神醫爛足

[227] Yan Huangqi, a commoner of Nanfeng City, developed sores on both feet, their festering putrescence stinking to the point that the populace were unable to tolerate it and drove him out. Having fled from them, he sold items made from horn in country villages, but the travellers’ hostels were also unable to bear him. On reaching the capital, he sneaked into the temple to the Five Ladies to spend the night, but at midnight he found himself chased by yellow-robed clerks, asking: “Who dares pollute this place with such stinking feet?” He apologised: “Unfortunately I have contracted a foul disease, and nowhere is able to tolerate it; I have risked my life to come here.” As they strove to grab him, the ladies shouted an order not to pursue him, and also called him before them, saying: “We will grant you a special prescription: to treat the sores take one sprig of indigo, dry it and grind to a powder, mix it into a little calomel, mix with spring water, daub it on, and healing will be immediate.” Yan bowed in thanks, complied with their instructions and treated the sores, which healed immediately.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.226-27 (Tale 405):

神醫爛足

[227] 南豐市民嚴黃七,兩足生瘡,臭穢潰爛,衆皆驅逐不容。逃出,貨角器於村野,而旅邸又不容。至京,潛投宿於五夫人祠下,夜半遭黃衣吏逐之,曰:「何人敢以腐穢腳觸污此間?」謝曰:「不幸纏惡疾,無處見容,冒死來此。」紛拏次,夫人抗聲令勿逐,且呼使前曰:「吾授汝妙方,用漏藍子一枚,生乾為末,入膩粉少許,井水調塗立效。」嚴拜謝,依而治之,頓愈。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).