A Ghost Seeks Acupuncture 鬼求針灸

When Xu Xi (886-975 CE) was governor of Sheyang, there were few people skilled in medicine, and his fame spread across the land. Once at night he heard a ghost moaning and groaning, its voice extremely mournful and bitter. Xu said: “You are a ghost; what can you need?” Then he heard the reply: “My family name is Dou, my own name Si, my household is in Dongyang, I suffered from back pain and died, and despite becoming a ghost the aches and pains are unbearable. I heard that the gentleman is skilled at acupuncture, and would like to be relieved of my suffering.” Xu said: “You are a ghost and without physical form; how should treatment be placed?” The ghost said: “The gentleman must only bind straw together as a person, seeking the vital points and inserting the needles there.” Xu followed these instructions and inserted needles at four points in the lower back and three points in the shoulder, set out offerings, and then buried it. The next day somebody came with thanks, saying: “Having received the gentleman’s treatment, and also the feast laid out, my illness is gone and my hunger sated; my gratitude for this kindness is extremely profound.” [238] He suddenly vanished.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.237-38 (Tale 428):

鬼求針灸

徐熙為射陽令,少善醫方,名聞海內。嘗夜聞有鬼呻吟,聲甚淒苦。徐曰:「汝是鬼,何所需?」俄聞答曰:「姓斛名斯,家在東陽,患腰痛死,雖為鬼而疼痛不可忍。聞君善針,願相救濟。」徐曰:「汝是鬼而無形,何厝治?」鬼曰:「君但縛芻為人,索孔穴針之。」徐如其言為針腰四處,又針肩三處,設祭而埋之。明日一人來謝曰:「蒙君醫療,復為設齋,病除饑解,感惠甚深。」 [238] 忽然不見。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

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A Woman Dies and Becomes A Snake 女死變蛇

A family in Linchuan had a daughter, very shrewd and clever, who died at age thirteen, and was buried next to the White Pagoda at Liutai. After several days, a white lotus flower grew up on the grave, shaped like a big fungus, about a foot in size at its base; due to this praise by the assembled immortals it was called the Buddha-girl Tomb. A scholar passed it and remarked to the crowd: “There must be a monstrous thing beneath; we should excavate and examine it urgently.” When the crowd dug her up, they tore open the coffin to see a huge python atop the jacket; there was no longer a girl at all, and they released it in their confusion. The girl’s mother said: “While pregnant with this girl, in dreams I repeatedly saw a huge python come and touch the bed curtains; crying out and looking with the lamp, all was quiet and there was nothing to see. Now I realise that this was an uncanny thing.”

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.243 (Tale 439):

女死變蛇

臨川民家生一女,甚慧黠,年十三死,瘞於流臺白塔之側。數日,有白蓮花生於墳上,似大菌,蒂長尺許,衆神之稱,(「之稱」原作「稱之」,據明刻本改。)曰佛女墳。有一士人過之,言於衆曰:「下必有怪物,急宜掘視。」衆掘之,剖棺見一巨蟒在衣衿上,不復有女子矣,惑遂解。其母云:「孕此女時,寢夢間屢見巨蟒來觸幃帳,呼燈視之,寂無所有,今方知是怪物也。」

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Dead Woman Bewitches People 死婦迷人

In a guiyou year, Qing Yang, the Censor of Hubei, had an intense dream about his term of office. Among the populace was a woman who was somewhat attractive and killed her husband, having different ambitions for herself. Her sentence being execution and display in the marketplace, when the hour of execution arrived a young physician saw her and said: “It will be enough if I take this person as a wife; have pity! Have pity!” He then acted like he was drunk, constantly smiling and giggling at the woman. Her father asked a Buddhist priest to deal with him and certify that the city god had arrested her soul; he said in judgement: “This person killed her husband and has already been subjected to the law of the realm. If she harms people after death, then she should be subject to heavenly punishment.” How grave! Those youths who harbour evil thoughts in their presumptuousness should take this as a warning.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.242 (Tale 437):

死婦迷人

癸酉,湖北憲青陽夢炎任內,民間有一婦人,稍有姿色,戕夫而有別志。獄成棄市,臨刑時有少年醫生見云:「我得此人為妻足矣,可惜!可惜!」生自此如醉,常對此婦人嬉笑。其父請法師治之,牒城隍拘其魂,判云:「生戕其夫,已遭王法;死復害人,當置天刑。」甚矣!後生妄起邪心者,當以為戒。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Dead Soul Returns Home 死魂歸家

In the autumn of the renwu year in the Zhiyuan era (1282), the lady née Chen, wife of Zhao Ruosu, fell ill and died. A little after three weeks later, her nephew Chen Hong came, lodging anxiously in the library. Zhao’s mother, lady Chen, lay in her coffin in the neighbouring room. Suddenly, during the night, the sound of a human voice emanated from the coffin, continuing indistinctly for some time. Not long after, there came several loud raps on the table, and a stern voice called: “Girl! I’m quite unable to help myself, and then you come to stir up trouble!” Chen, terrified, gathered candles and unlocked the door, but all was quiet with nothing to see. On the table the sustaining offerings were covered in dust, but visible among this were two fresh palm-prints. The next day at noon, news of their neighbour’s daughter’s death arrived. They then realised that the previous night’s voice was the dead woman’s soul receiving advance warning of this.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.241 (Tale 436):

死魂歸家

至元壬午秋,趙若涑妻陳氏病卒。越二旬,其姪陳紘來,懸宿於書館內。隔房乃趙母陳氏柩在焉。忽中夜聞柩間有人語聲,良久莫辨。未幾忽拍桌兩下,厲聲曰:「女兒,我自也沒奈何,你又來相攪!」陳大恐,朋燭啟鑰,寂無所見。供養桌上皆塵埃,視之有二掌痕獨新。次日午,果趙之適女訃音至。始知昨夕之聲,(「聲」,明刻本作「怪」。)魂已先知矣。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Ghost Avenges Injustice to A Son 鬼雪子冤

In the Song Xianchun era, the jiaxu year (1274), Zhao Shichun of Jizhou was appointed to the Jinghu Regional Investigation Office as an investigating officer. One evening, sitting alone in his rooms, writing out in vain a draft of the affairs of his relatives’ lives and deaths, when he began to have a suspicious feeling, and suddenly heard a voice like that of an elderly woman coming from outside the window; he picked up a sheet of paper lying near a tear in the partition, and stepped forward to read it. It read: “My son Wei was murdered by Lan so-and-so, his body cut into two pieces, one in the grassy pool and one on the bank, then buried by Peng so-and-so, where they still remain. Now the corpse gathered sprouts moustaches, and must be the body of Zhao Baiqi. My son had no moustache, and also wore no black coat.” When had finished reading, the handwriting disappeared. Zhao, greatly alarmed, petitioned the chief clerks the next day, using all his might to redress this business, pursuing the murderer, [240] named Lan, from office; each admitted their guilt and was sentenced.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.239-40 (Tale 433):

鬼雪子冤

宋咸淳甲戌,吉州趙師櫄任京湖憲司檢法官。一夕,獨然燈在閒室中,書擬黄其姓者身死事,方疑貳間,忽聞窗外有似老嫗聲,持一紙在隙間而進,視之,寫云:「我兒委被藍某殺死,分屍作兩段,一在草潭內,一在岸上,得彭某用土掩埋,至今尚在。今所檢之屍生鬚者,乃是趙百七屍身。我兒無鬚,更無皁衫也。」看畢,字跡即滅。趙大驚,次日稟使長,力平反此事,追行兇人 [240] 藍其姓者出官,一一伏罪就刑。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Ghosts Play Music 鬼動絲竹

Zhao [?]Efu was Deputy Magistrate in Tanzhou, and had been in the post for two months. One evening, returning from a drinking engagement with colleagues, at midnight he heard the sound of strings and woodwind coming from the next wall; Zhao wondered at this, and questioned his retinue, who answered: “Next door is an old residence with courtyard and garden; whenever it is rainy and overcast music and drums start up together, but it is not music of this world.” Once, not long after, Chong, one of Zhao’s deputies, had died suddenly, and when they were about to collect his coffin Chong’s corpse suddenly leapt up and sat, [?]stiffening its feet[?], and sticking out its tongue three or four cun (roughly inches), it then bit down, and blood flowing freely, suddenly fell on its back and [?]expired[?]. Outside the hall the music sounded even more clear and resonant than before. It was then they realised that these were ghosts of those dying suddenly.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.238 (Tale 429):

鬼動絲竹

趙通判[王+葛]夫倅潭州,在任兩月。一夕,同僚會飲歸,夜半聞隔牆有管絃絲竹之聲,趙怪之,問左右,乃曰:「隔牆乃是舊宅院花園,凡遇陰雨,鼓樂交作,非陽世之音樂也。」曾不踰時,趙倅一寵暴亡,臨斂棺時,寵屍忽躍起而坐,札腳,吐舌長三四寸,咬血淋漓,須臾偃逝,庭外絲竹之音響亮非常比。時乃知皆此暴亡之鬼也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Ghost Helps Fell Trees 鬼助伐木

A carpenter, Li Jian, once went alone into the mountains to cut timber to build a house. One day at noon he saw a person, tall in stature and ugly in appearance, and seemingly engraved all over, suddenly appearing before him. Li was about to chop down a tree, and the other also took up and used an axe; when asked his name, he called himself “Dr Hua.” Li’s heart leapt with fear, believing him to be a mountain goblin, and staring round couldn’t see anyone else, so yelled out several times to the spirits about his plight. The other leapt up and, excited, said:  “You suspect me, which makes it hard to help you.” Uttering a long, loud cry, it climbed a tree and departed.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.238 (Tale 430):

鬼助伐木

木匠李監,嘗為人入山造木料架屋。一日午,見一人身長而貌醜,遍體雕質,(「質」,明刻本作「青」。)突如其前。李方伐木,彼亦用斤,問其姓名,則自稱曰「花博士」。李心驚悸,以為山之精怪,旁顧無人,即呼所事之神數聲。其人躍然而興曰:「爾既疑我,難以為助。」長嘯攀樹而去。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).