Xie Lingyun’s Beard 謝靈運鬚

Xie Lingyun (385-433 CE), facing execution, cut off his beard and gave it to a Buddhist monastery in Guangzhou. The beard was three chi in length (c. 1m), and exists to this day.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.20 (Tale 99):

謝靈運鬚

謝靈運臨刑,剪其鬚施廣州佛寺。鬚長三尺,今存焉。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

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Wu Yinzhi’s Integrity 吴隱之廉潔

Wu Yinzhi[1] served as Governor of Guangzhou. In ancient times there was a spring, and people who drank from it became corrupt and wanton; Yinzhi poured it, drank it, paid out double his land tax, and composed a poem:

The ancients said of this water,

That one sip addicted to riches.

If Yi and Qi[2] were to try it,

Their loyalties would never have changed

Moreover, he dwelt in mourning for his mother, showed exceptional etiquette and suffered poverty in his household, and having no choice but to wait until midnight, often hearing a pair of cranes calling in shock at midnight, Yinzhi would always rise and weep, never missing a single time.

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories), 上1.18 (Tale 91):

吴隱之廉潔

吴隱之為廣州刺史。舊有貪泉,人飲之則貪黷,隱之酌而飲之,兼賦詩曰:「古人云此水,一歃懐千金。試使夷齊飲,終當不易心。」又居母喪,過禮,家貧,無以候宵分,常有雙鶴至夜半驚唳,隱之起哭,不失其時。

Li Rong 李冗, Du yi zhi, 獨異志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories) in Du yi zhi, Xuanshi Zhi 獨異志,宣室志 (Outstanding Fantastic Stories, Stories from the Chamber of Dissemination), edited by Zhang Yongqin 张永钦 and Hou Zhiming 侯志明 (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1983)

[1] On Wu Yinzhi 吴隱之, courtesy name Chumo 處默 (d.c. 413 CE), see https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%90%B4%E9%9A%90%E4%B9%8B.

[2] This refers to Bo Yi 伯夷 and Shu Qi 叔齊, famed for their selfless morality. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boyi_and_Shuqi; http://chinaheritage.net/reader/reading/loyalty/sima-qian-%E5%8F%B8%E9%A6%AC%E9%81%B7-a-biography-of-boyi-and-shuqi-%E4%BC%AF%E5%A4%B7%E5%88%97%E5%82%B3/

Feilai Hall 飛來殿宇

Feilai Hall is in the Qingyuan Gorge, in Guangzhou, and is the thirty-second earthly paradise. The gorge seems to be squeezed between two peaks, with a great river running through the middle, and is thickly forested, and people say that a Buddhist temple flew there in ancient times. In the mountain opposite is a huge bell, which had also flown there; when at times it has sounded by itself, people have decided to leave, and though searched for were never seen again. The temple’s stone tablet recorded [72] the day, month and year on which it had flown in, but now this is no longer recorded. The ancient poem reads: “The ape wearing the jade ring returns to the cave; the rhinoceros drawing the golden cord passes before the bay.” Thus is the scene in this gorge.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.71-72 (Tale 125):

飛來殿宇

飛來殿在廣州清遠峽,乃天下第三十二福地。峽中兩山如夾,中通大江,林木深茂,相傳古有佛殿飛來此地。及對面山中有巨鍾,亦是飛來,或自嗚,人有意去尋則不復見矣。寺碑俱載 [72] 某年月日某處寺中飛來,茲不復錄。古詩云「猨帶玉環歸後洞,犀拖金索過前灣」,峽中景也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Lady Chong Fu the Divine Warrior 崇福夫人神兵

In Guangzhou City, in Nanwu Village, there is a temple to Boundless Lady Chong Fu, jade tiled and vermillion ridged, grand and majestic in form. When the southern ships came and went, none failed to appeal to the spirits there. Painted, dressed and coiffured likenesses of the lady in the temple’s rear hall, with luan-bird mirrors, phoenix hairpins, dragon shawls, elephant combs, bed canopies, robes, gold and silver dishes, remarkable treasures in pearl and jade, piled to every side and all presented as tribute by seagoing merchants, each placed in storage and preserved. All maritime traders were able to come to the temple to pray and practice divination, and those permitted to borrow or lend money freely encountered wind and waves without harm, their profits knowing no limits. The temple possessed two storehouses, for receipt and disbursement. When ships faced dangerous winds and called on the spirit from afar, if a wheel of fire curled around the vessel, it could face the danger without needing to worry. Those who passed the temple in prayer continued without exception in respect and veneration.

During the Song era, powerful bandits caused disturbances around Dayi Peak, and had not been captured for a long time. The pursuing general entered the temple to pray, but, as the matter was urgent, had no time to report in full, so wrote out two sentences, throwing the paper into the canopy and leaving. (There were no means available to press the evil influence out of the borders; all of Ping’s subordinates suggested great stratagems.) This general led his troops forward, lodging below Dayi Peak, and at night dreamed of a person like the present deity Zhifu, holding a white banner, on which was inscribed: ‘Leader of 300,000 Nether-World Troops, Devoted to the Realm Following the Gentleman’s Example’. The next day, the general led his forces in a rapid assault, and just as the armies clashed, clouds and mist suddenly arose on all sides. A banner emerged faintly from among it, bearing the six characters ‘Boundless Lady Dedicated to the Realm’. When the bandits saw this, they fled in panic and fear, and were all surrounded and apprehended. During the Zhiyuan era (1264-94) he submitted to the Great Yuan, repeatedly showing loyalty to the realm and protecting the populace. The court issued him ever more orders, and even today the temple receives many offerings of joss and incense.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.213 (Tale 378):

崇福夫人神兵

廣州城南五里,有崇福無極夫人廟,碧瓦朱甍,廟貌雄壯,南船往來,無不乞靈於此。廟之後宮繪畫夫人梳裝之像,如鸞鏡、鳳釵、龍巾、象櫛、牀帳、衣服、金銀器皿、珠玉異寶,堆積滿前,皆海商所獻,各有庫藏收掌。凡販海之人,能就廟祈筊,許以錢本借貸者,縱遇風濤而不害,獲利亦不貲。廟有出納二庫掌之。船有遇風險者,遙呼告神,若有火輪到船旋繞,縱險亦不必憂。凡過廟禱祈者,無不各生敬心。宋朝大姨山有強盗擾攘,久而未獲。捕將入禱,事急不暇禱告,乃書二句投於帷幄之中而去。(壓境妖氛無計掃,全憑帷幄授鴻籌。)其將引兵前往,宿於大姨山之下,夜夢一人如今之直符,手持一白旗,上題曰:「總領陰(「陰」原作「一」,據明刻本改。)兵三十萬,一心報國效公忠。」明日,其將引兵亟攻,兵刃既接,忽見雲霧四起,隱隱有旗出於中,(「中」原作「巾」,據明刻本改。)上有「無極夫人報國」六字,賊見之,驚懼奔潰,悉為掩捕。至元歸附大元,屢嘗忠國護民,朝廷累加宣命,至今香火尤甚。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).