Beat A Dog, Receive Punishment 擊犬受報

Long ago there was a temple monk who kept a dog and loved it. One day he went away some distance, and a passing traveller beat the dog to death and buried it in the rear garden. When the monk returned, he searched and searched but couldn’t find it, but the traveller reported its death. When the monk went to look for it in the burial place, it turned out that the dog had already turned into a huge serpent, its eyes alone not yet having transformed. The abbot hastily ruled that the traveller should chant sutras to redress the injustice. Suddenly, however, the same abbot had an enlightening dream and understood how to repay the crime. They then placed the traveller under a heavy cover. The serpent gradually approached, raising its head before the monk, and then went to seek the traveller. It coiled closely around him for three days and then departed, and when they lifted the cover and looked, the traveller was dead. All that remained were old dry bones.

Anon., Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.123 (Tale 216):

擊犬受報

昔有寺僧,蓄一犬,愛之。一日遠出,行者擊殺此犬,埋於後園。僧歸,尋不見,行〔者〕(據上下文補,下同。)以死告。僧於所埋處尋看,則犬已化為巨蛇矣,眼猶未開。主僧急令行者誦經釋冤。忽主僧感夢,知有冤報,遂用鍾蓋此行〔者〕於中。其蛇冉冉而來,昂頭於僧之前,遍尋此行〔者〕,繞鍾三日而去。及揭視,行者已死,惟存枯骨而已。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

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Fostered Swallows Show Gratitude 飼燕知恩

During the Yuanyou era (1086-1094), a daughter of the Wang family, named Yasan, lived in Qingxi, in Yanzhou. She saw a mother swallow, whose three chicks were not yet able to leave the nest, being eaten by a cat, and daily took food to feed them, until they grew up and flew away. That winter, Yasan fell ill and died. The next spring, the three swallows returned, flying around and around her room without stopping. Her mother said: “You are flying in search of Yasan, aren’t you? Yasan is dead; she is buried in the back garden. Follow me if you want to find her.” Her mother walked, the swallows flying behind her, until they reached the garden, where she pointed to the tomb. The three swallows flew to the grave, crying out, and then, using their beaks, all dug themselves into the earth and died.

Anon, Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 前2.120 (Tale 209):

飼燕知恩

元祐間,嚴州青溪王氏女,名亞三。見燕母為貓所食,有未出巢燕子三,每日將飯飼之,後長大飛去。其冬,亞三病死。次春,三燕復來,飛繞其屋不已。母曰:「你飛尋亞三否?亞三已死,葬在後園中,欲尋則隨我去。」母行,燕飛隨後,至園,母指墓,三小燕飛鳴於墓,以嘴鑽入墓土中皆死。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

Embalmed Corpses Accept Service 殯柩受役

In Jiangling Fu there was a Magistrate Shen, who, having been in office for a year, sighed out his last breath and died. His orphaned child, only just ten years old, was unable to bear the coffin to its burial place, so left it temporarily at the Water And Land Temple outside the city walls. Only after some ten years were his son and relatives able to take the coffin back to his homeland. That night in a dream he appeared to his son, saying: “While waiting for burial in this temple I have been put to use among its guardian spirits, and up to now have had no means of escape. Fortunately I can now return to my true home, my spirit and soul can begin to return to themselves, and I can find a chance of reincarnation.”

Also, in Lin’an Fu, during the Song era, a minister’s wife died in the official residence and before they were able to return for her burial, her coffin was stored in the Puji Temple outside the city walls. She suddenly appeared in a dream to her household, saying: “You who I call my family, day and night I suffer bitter service as a guardian spirit; if I gain a quick return for burial I can be spared this.” Her followers said: “You are a noble lady and forced into service? How can this be?” The lady [247] said: “In life I enjoyed titles bestowed by the realm and could only be noble, but in death I too am merely a spirit. Besides, because filth of my remains pollute this pure realm, how could I not be punished, and, serving for a while, be fortunate in this?” These two affairs, though separated by several thousand li, tally closely, and can only be seen as a warning.

Anon, Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.246-47 (Tale 445):

殯柩受役

江陵府有沈察推者,到任一年,感時氣而死。遺孤始十歲,未克扶柩歸葬,因權厝城外水陸寺。凡十餘年,其子與親戚始能取柩歸鄉。是夜見夢於其子曰:「我自旅殯此寺,即為伽藍神驅役,至今未得生路。幸得歸掩真宅,神魂始得自如,而轉生有期矣。」

又臨安府有宋朝時相夫人,終於相府,未獲歸葬,權厝城外普濟寺。忽見夢於其門人云:「為我語家人,日夕苦於伽藍神之役,得速歸葬,則免此矣。」門人曰:「以夫人而見役,何也?」夫 [247] 人曰:「我生享國封,不為不貴,而死亦鬼耳。況以遺骸滓穢淨界,得不獲罪,而姑役使之,亦幸矣。」二事相去數千里,符合如一,不可不以為戒也。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).

A Skull Becomes A Monster 髑髏為怪

A villager surnamed Liu, of Guosheng Village, Jutian County, sometimes fell into a mania, walking around wildly without avoiding wells or chasms. His family invited the exorcist Hou Gongmin to treat him. Just after Gongmin arrived, Liu suddenly rose and said: “I am going away for a bit; don’t pretend this is your doing.” He therefore picked up a stick from the firewood and went into the fields, stripping to his waist and carrying it over his shoulder, he then acted as if he were beating something. Coming back after a long time, he said: “My sickness is over, I have been and beaten the head of a spirit into the earth, burying it among the fields.” His brothers and the exorcist thought he was still manic, so went together to have a look. Liu had exhumed a skull, from which jutted a dozen stalks. His illness was immediately relieved.

Anon, Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.244 (Tale 441):

髑髏為怪

奉天縣國盛村百姓姓劉,病狂發時,亂走不避井塹,其家為迎禁咒人侯公敏治之。公敏才至,劉忽起曰:「我暫出,不假爾活。」因杖薪擔至田中,袒而運擔,狀若擊物。良久而返,乃曰:「我病已矣,適打一鬼頭落,埋於田中。」兄弟及咒者猶以為狂,遂同往觀之。劉掘出一髑髏,戴發十餘莖,其病頓愈。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986)

A Corpse Dances 死屍鼓舞

In Hedong there was a villager whose wife had died recently and had not yet been prepared for her coffin. When night fell, his family suddenly became aware of a sound like music approaching slowly; when it reached the hall, her corpse began to move. A little layer, the music seemed to enter the roof of the hall, and her body then rose and danced. As the melody gradually moved away, the corpse turned and pirouetted out through the gates, following the as it departed. Her family were shocked and terrified, but the night was moonless and they did not dare pursue her. That same night the villager had just returned and, realising what had happened, took up a staff and followed her to a grove of tombs, and after about five or six li, again heard the music coming from a cypress grove. Drawing near to the trees, there was the glimmer of a fire, and the corpse was dancing next to it. The villager grasped his staff and beat the corpse until it fell on the ground. The music stopped, too, and he then returned, bearing the body in his back.

Anon, Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi, 後2.241 (Tale 435):

死屍鼓舞

河東有一村民,妻新死未殮。日暮,其家忽覺有樂聲漸近,至庭宇,屍亦微動。少焉,樂聲入房,如在梁棟間,屍遂起舞。樂聲漸出,屍倒旋出門,隨樂聲而去。其家驚懼,時月黑不敢尋逐。將夜,村民方歸,知之,乃持杖逐至一墓林,約五六里,復聞樂聲在一柏林上,及近樹之下,有火熒然,屍方舞矣。村民持杖擊屍倒地,樂聲亦住,遂負屍而返。

Yuan Haowen 元好問, Chang Zhenguo 常振國 (ed), Xu Yijian zhi 續夷堅志 (Continued Records of the Listener), and Anon., Jin Xin 金心 (ed.), Huhai xinwen yijian xuzhi 湖海新聞夷堅續志 (Continuation of Records of the Listener with New Items from the Lakes and Seas) (Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1986).